Seeking Power

Revelation 2:26

(26) And he that overcometh, and keepeth my works unto the end, to him will I give power over the nations:

Consider how much the lust for power is a major motivating force in this world. It can be seen operating in families, in workplaces, in churches, and in commerce—and possibly, it is most visible in politics. We can see in all of these instances that people are doing what they can to obtain power, often by any means available, fair or foul. They are just following the influence

1 John 5:19) of the one who first lusted for power: “I will exalt my throne above the stars of God; I will also sit on the mount of the congregation on the farthest sides of the north; I will ascend above the heights of the clouds, I will be like the Most High’” (Isaiah 14:13-14).

While the world is struggling to get power, God promises to give it to us as a byproduct of enduring to the end. In this life, the only power we have to strive for is power over ourselves. In the next, God will provide the rest.

Those who seek power in this world miss the fact that our life is but for a moment. Even if they do receive the power they seek, it lasts only for an instant in comparison. Consider how long our power will last if we endure to the end: “The LORD knows the days of the upright, and their inheritance shall be forever” (Psalm 37:18

God’s Time

a973471fc6c093e8cdbe479da1fdd9a7---timothy--english-movies

 

2 Peter 3: 8-9

8) But, beloved, be not ignorant of this one thing, that one day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. (9) The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.

The overrall subject is the return of Jesus Christ. When Peter wrote this, there were stirrings within the church that the second coming had already occurred.

The apostles thought the return of Jesus Christ would happen within their lifetimes because they did not fully understand God’s timeframe. Undoubtedly, people were becoming discouraged because they felt that matters were going awry in their world. They were frightened, anxious, and in pain, crying out, “How long, O Lord?” They were becoming impatient, and it seemed that everything was continuing as it had, and nothing was changing except for the worse. Some were becoming so discouraged that they were leaving the church.

So Peter writes that the Lord is not slack concerning His promise. God does not lie; He will send His Son to this earth. However, He is being very patient, and this is Peter’s emphasis.

What kind of a plan could God devise that would produce the best in terms of character and the most in terms of the number of children who inherit His Kingdom? How could He be merciful and forgiving without being merely indulgent? What could He use as points of reference that would motivate people to continue to strive toward the conclusion of His purpose once He had mercifully forgiven them?

“That with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day” indicates that God does not look at time as we do. To us, time is very pressing because we realize we will live only about seventy years. As we get older, the fact of death becomes an increasingly clearer reality. When we are twenty, we hardly ever think about death unless somebody close dies. But as we age, we think about death more frequently. Our bodies start running down. We do not have the vigor, the energy, the vitality, or the strength we used to have. We are aware of these things because we begin to feel them slip away. It becomes easier for us to become impatient because we have so many things we want to do and accomplish, yet time keeps flying by.

With God, though, time is not so critical. If a thousand years with God is as a day, how much is seventy years, the life of a human being? Nothing more than the blink of an eye. How many blinks of an eye—human lifetimes—end every day? Tens of thousands of them! Blink—they are gone, but they experienced every second of their lives. They were born and played through childhood. They went to school. They became adult men and women. They married and raised families. They watched their children grow up. They fought wars. They endured droughts and famines, diseases, and depressions. They watched death approaching, and they died. All this—a blink of an eye to God.

We cannot begin to grasp the enormity of what God is doing until we begin to consider the scope of the thousands of years that have already passed and the billions of lives that have been lived. We must begin to look at the much bigger picture yet retain a human perspective of time and life, understanding that, to God, time means almost nothing because He has power over life and death. Vast and awesome is the scope of what God is working out, but we need to look at what is going on through the understanding God has given us of Himself.

Cathey Lynn

Feeling Lost In Your Life


And she called the name of the Lord that spake unto her, Thou God seest me: for she said, Have I also here looked after him that seeth me?  Genesis 16:13
As I stared out the window washing dishes yet again, I couldn’t help but feel as if I were marking time. Being a older widow is not a easy life. You feel your life has passed you by and hope seems so far away.

Exactly how much time had I spent in front of the sink over the years with my hands in hot, soapy water, running circles over a plate with a rag or twisting it inside then outside a dirty cup? What else could I have accomplished in my life if I weren’t cleaning up the kitchen multiple times a day?

On that sunny afternoon, a tear escaped from the corner of one eye, quickly traveling to the bottom of my chin where it hung for a few seconds before dropping into the sudsy water below.

I felt lost.

Lost in the middle of my own life.

I’ve wondered if all the time I’ve spent doing mundane activities means anything to anyone. It’s more than just the dishes … the laundry and other household chores, they seemed so cyclical and redundant.

And then there is the issue of time.

Time moves more quickly by the minute. All of the people and things I loved simultaneously seemed to make me feel invisible.

I felt hidden.

Unnoticed.

Unseen.

As I stood with yet another tear making its way down the path of the first, I uttered an aching whisper to my heavenly Father. I told Him how I felt and asked Him to help me remember my unconditional value in Him.

And then He reminded me.

He reminded me about Hagar, who also felt hidden, unnoticed, unseen and forgotten. She had done the mundane work of being a servant girl and now felt tossed aside. (Genesis 16:6) She was alone when God spoke to her. And He told her that He saw her.

He saw her circumstances and assured her He had a plan — a plan that involved her continuing in the mundane work for a season.

And then He reminded me of others who also may have felt a little lost during a mundane season of life.

He saw Ruth doing the mundane work of picking up the leftover grain in the field for a season (Ruth 2:2), and He reminded me how it prepared Ruth for her husband.

He saw David doing the mundane work of shepherding sheep for a season (1 Samuel 16:19), and He reminded me how it prepared him to one day become King David.

He saw Peter and other disciples doing the mundane work of casting nets in hopes of catching a bounty of fish (Matthew 4:19), and He reminded me how it prepared the disciples to be fishers of men.

As I stood staring out the window, my heavenly Father reminded me that He saw me. He lovingly assured me my life was not lost to Him. He saw me doing the mundane work of dishes, diapers and dinner. He tenderly reminded me that my work didn’t define me but instead created character and beauty in my heart and home. He reminded me that even mundane work can be an act of worship.

He reminded me what I was doing was the primary work for a season, and that my faithfulness would lay a foundation for what may be ahead.

I was not lost at all. He saw me. The woman I am, the woman I’ve been and the woman I wanted to be. He knows how to care for me in each season and also prepare me for seasons to come.

Dear heavenly Father, I’m so glad to know that You see me. I’m so glad to know You value me unconditionally because I am Yours. Help me when I feel unseen, unnoticed or forgotten. Remind me that even my ordinary, routine work can be done for Your glory and that my life — even on mundane days — matters to You. In Jesus’ Name, Amen

Cathey Lynn

Wisdom Says

Ecclesiastes 7 15-18

15) All things have I seen in the days of my vanity: there is a just man that perisheth in his righteousness, and there is a wicked man that prolongeth his life in his wickedness. (16) Be not righteous over much; neither make thyself over wise: why shouldest thou destroy thyself ? (17) Be not over much wicked, neither be thou foolish: why shouldest thou die before thy time? (18) It is good that thou shouldest take hold of this; yea, also from this withdraw not thine hand: for he that feareth God shall come forth of them all.

We need to realize that, if we do not understand a paradoxical situation in which we are involved and then handle it improperly, the quality of our relationship with God—and therefore the quality of our lives—may suffer. Such a circumstance is much more difficult to discern if one is personally involved.

The danger does not always have to be one involving a paradox. It can be any exceptionally difficult, personal trial, one that never seems to end. When involved in such a trial, we are not merely observing it but are deeply enmeshed in it.

Despite any seeming irregularities in the situation, we can be certain that the great purposes of God are being accomplished. But more direct involvement makes our choices and judgment more difficult and damaging because of our emotional ties to both God and the paradox. Therefore, because his faith is in God, the righteous person will wisely and humbly accept that the irregularities will pass, and all the vanities of this world will also pass with them. The wise will patiently endure the irregularities of this world as a momentary glitch in comparison to eternity. He can do this if he fully understands some important factors a person might fear.

Thus, wisdom says, “This is a situation I cannot truly change. I will not let this seeming injustice dominate my life because more is going on here than meets my eye.” He will ask himself, “Is there anything I can do to help my judgment so this doesn’t destroy my attitude and with it my faith and fear of God
Cathey Lynn