Soul Poison

Soul Poison

August 21, 2017

When I kept silent, my bones grew old through my groaning all the day long.
Psalm 32:3

Recommended Reading: 2 Samuel 12:1-5

There are two extremes. Those who rush to the doctor for every ache and pain and those who avoid the doctor at all costs, telling themselves, “It’s not that bad.” But when an issue does need attention, covering it up only makes it worse. If this is true of the physical body, how much more so of our souls.

When we are silent about our sin and shortcomings, our souls suffer. What begins as intentional minimizing of sin turns into blindness to both the sin and its effects. Our view of ourselves is skewed. We begin to say, “This is just who I am.” Sin not only damages our connection to God, but our connection to others.

David learned this firsthand when he tried to cover up his sin with Bathsheba. When the prophet Nathan confronted David, the cure for sin’s poison was revealed. As we confess and repent, God welcomes us back. Although the consequences of our choices remain, God’s forgiveness and the penetrating light of His truth bring life and restoration to our souls and relationships.

God’s arrows of affliction are sharp and painful so He can get our attention. He won’t let His beloved children get away with sin because He knows it robs us of blessings, opportunities, and even character refinement.



Charles Stanley

Cathey Lynn

The Battle

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Revelation 12: 7-9

Too many churches today never preach on the book of Revelations. Most think it is very imitating and to complicated to explain. We should all be interested in the end times. It is the Word. Memorize this truth: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1). … We are never to understand the very deep things of God, but it was written for us to study not to ignore.

 

(7) And there was war in heaven: Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels, (8) And prevailed not; neither was their place found any more in heaven. (9) And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.

 

Although written in a prophetic sense, these verses probably also describe what happened when Hêlêl attacked God’s throne in pre-history. God and His angels, led by Michael, cast the former Hêlêl (Hebrew for Lucifer)—no longer a “shining one,” but now called Satan the Devil, the Deceiver, the Adversary, the Opposition—along with his angels, back to the earth, evidently causing great destruction all over the galaxy. And here they have remained.

Jude 6 records, “And the angels who did not keep their proper domain [the earth], but left their own abode, He has reserved in everlasting chains under darkness for the judgment of the great day.” God has bound them to the earth while they await their ultimate judgment. Though no place was found in heaven for them anymore, the book of Job says that Satan can present himself before God’s throne on occasion. Earth, however, is their habitation. While only as free as God allows them to be, they can still deceive and prey on mankind.

The Bible and human history fill in what has happened since. It is evident that from creation, mankind has been living side by side with millions of demonic opponents led by the chief adversary, Satan the Devil. Apparently, this was part of God’s plan for His children. He wants us to choose His way, to overcome and grow despite being surrounded by evil.

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

What Can It Be


He brought me forth also into a large place; he delivered me; because he delighted in me (Psalms 18:19).
And what is this “large place”? What can it be but God Himself, that infinite Being in whom all other beings and all other streams of life terminate? God is a large place indeed. And it was through humiliation, through abasement, through nothingness that David was brought into it.

“I bare you on eagle’s wings, and brought you unto myself” (Exod. 19:4).

Fearing to launch on “full surrender’s” tide,
I asked the Lord where would its waters glide
My little bark, “To troubled seas I dread?”
“Unto Myself,” He said.

Weeping beside an open grave I stood,
In bitterness of soul I cried to God:
“Where leads this path of sorrow that I tread?”
“Unto Myself,” He said.

Striving for souls, I loved the work too well;
Then disappointments came; I could not tell
The reason, till He said, “I am thine all;
Unto Myself I call.”

Watching my heroes–those I loved the best–
I saw them fail; they could not stand the test,
Even by this the Lord, through tears not few,
Unto Himself me drew.

Unto Himself! No earthly tongue can tell
The bliss I find, since in His heart I dwell;
The things that charmed me once seem all as naught;
Unto Himself I’m brought.

Cathey Lynn