Trials Of Many

July 25, 2017

Trials Of Many

No question we all have and are now going through trials that the big question is WHY! And I myself have been in those depths of darkness for the past couple of years that I would like to understand, but humbly and patiently I wait for it to be revealed. We just have to remind ourselves that God’s in control. His ways are higher than our ways and his thoughts are higher than our thoughts. Isaiah 55:8

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What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt know hereafter (John 13:7).

We have only a partial view here of God’s dealings, His half-completed, half-developed plan; but all will stand out in fair and graceful proportions in the great finished Temple of Eternity!

Go, in the reign of Israel’s greatest king, to the heights of Lebanon. See that noble cedar, the pride of its compeers, an old wrestler with northern blasts! Summer loves to smile upon it, night spangles its feathery foliage with dewdrops, the birds nestle on its branches, the weary pilgrim or wandering shepherd reposes under its shadows from the midday heat or from the furious storm; but all at once it is marked out to fall; The aged denizen of the forest is doomed to succumb to the woodman’s stroke!

As we see the axe making its first gash on its gnarled trunk, then the noble limbs stripped of their branches, and at last the “Tree of God,” as was its distinctive epithet, coming with a crash to the ground, we exclaim against the wanton destruction, the demolition of this proud pillar in the temple of nature. We are tempted to cry with the prophet, as if inviting the sympathy of every lowlier stem–invoking inanimate things to resent the affront–“Howl, fir tree; for the cedar has fallen!”

But wait a little. Follow that gigantic trunk as the workmen of Hiram launch it down the mountain side; thence conveyed in rafts along the blue waters of the Mediterranean; and last of all, behold it set a glorious polished beam in the Temple of God. As you see its destination, placed in the very Holy of Holies, in the diadem of the Great King–say, can you grudge that “the crown of Lebanon” was despoiled, in order that this jewel might have so noble a setting? That cedar stood as a stately prop in Nature’s sanctuary, but “the glory of the latter house was greater than the glory of the former!”

How many of our souls are like these cedars of old! God’s axes of trial have stripped and bared them. We see no reason for dealings so dark and mysterious, but He has a noble end and object in view; to set them as everlasting pillars and rafters in His Heavenly Zion; to make them a “crown of glory in the hand of the Lord, and a royal diadem in the hand of our God.”
–Macduff

I do not ask my cross to understand,
My way to see–
Better in darkness just to feel Thy hand,
And follow Thee.

@wearywithsorrow

A Godly Man Leads

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July 23, 2017

A Godly Man Leads

A husband is called to lead his wife. Though this is an unpopular statement in this day and in this culture, it is one that Christians must affirm. Male headship is taught so clearly in Scripture that to deny it leaves us prone to fall into any number of other radically false teachings. If we can read the Bible and walk away denying male headship, we can walk away denying any doctrine that offends our sensibilities.

The godly husband is to lead his family. You are to lead your family. Though some may assume that this is a kind of leadership that depends on fear and dominance, the Bible teaches something very different. When speaking of male headship, the Bible gives us the ultimate example of ultimate leadership. “For the husband is the head of the wife even as Christ is the head of the church, his body, and is himself its Savior” (Ephesians 5:23). The husband is to be head of his wife in the same way that Christ is head of his church. Christ loved the church so much that he counted it as more precious than his own life. He gave up his own life so that she might live. If you wish to lead your family in a way that is faithful to Scripture, you will study the way Christ loved the church and you will seek to imitate your Savior.

There are different areas or levels of leadership within the family structure. The wife leads areas of the family and older children may assume leadership in some areas. In a household that includes in-laws or non-family members there may be more levels of leadership even than that. But as husband you are the leader of leaders. You are responsible for overall direction, vision, leadership of the family. The buck stops with you. We see this, for example, in 1 Timothy 3:12 where we find among the qualifications for a deacon that he must manage his children and his household well. He manages well by leading well.

This is more a responsibility than it is a privilege (see Matthew 20:26-28). This is an opportunity for you to serve your family through godly, servant leadership. As the leader of the leaders you ensure that others are leading as they should, that they are leading only in the areas they should. You will find humble and dignified ways of ensuring that others are leading well and that they are doing what they should as they should.

@wearywithsorrow

 

Growing Weary In Prayer

Ezekiel 9:4

And the Lord said unto him, Go through the midst of the city, through the midst of Jerusalem, and set a mark upon the foreheads of the men that sigh and that cry for all the abominations that be done in the midst thereof.

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July 24, 2017

Matthew 12:34-37

Have we ever considered applying this principle a little differently? Most of us naturally think of this passage to refer to our conversations with others at home, at work, at play, at the store, at church services, etc. But what about applying it to ourselves when we are on our knees before God? Have we ever considered that out of the abundance of our prayers – or the lack thereof – our heart speaks?

Further, do we deeply consider what we say to God? Do we take the time to organize and improve how we present our requests to Him? Do we think about the attitude in which we come before the great God of the universe?

Though we may not always count it a blessing, God knows our every thought, every desire, every emotion. It is impossible to hide anything from Him (Hebrews 4:13). The beauty in truly understanding this is that we may as well be totally honest with Him, telling Him everything, because He already knows the deepest intents of our hearts!

He sees the tender feelings we have toward the plights of others and our desire to help. He notes the patience, forbearance, and true outgoing concern we have for the brethren in the church. He knows the deep love we have for those who request our prayers for their healing. He observes our sighing and crying over the wretched world we live in (see Ezekiel 9:4).

Conversely, He also sees when we are being self-centered, pigheadedly pursuing our own desires, and justifying what we want as opposed to what is right and good in His sight. He notices when we ignore the needs of others. He surely must shake His head in shame when we excuse ourselves for not doing what we know to be righteous.

God is acutely aware of our attitudes when approaching His throne. He discerns whether we consider time spent in conversation with Him to be of great value, or whether we are just going through the motions. Because He knows what we are going through at all times, He knows when we are harboring grudges, doubts, malice, lust, impatience, covetousness, and any other carnal motivation against another. Certainly, He realizes that we will not be at our best every time we enter His presence, but He can tell when we are distracted or disinterested.

God is shaping us for future offices in His Kingdom, and He learns a great deal about us as we come before Him in prayer. He truly does listen to what we bring before Him, but He always considers our heart and our reasoning in His response to us.

This does not mean that we have to pray perfectly every time, having every word and rationale in its proper place, although doing so should be our goal. Romans 8:26-27 assures us:

Likewise the Spirit also helps in our weaknesses. For we know not what we should pray for as we ought, but the Spirit . . . makes intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. Now He who searches the hearts knows what the mind of the Spirit is, because He [Jesus Christ; see verse 34] makes intercession for the saints according to the will of God.

Even though we might not put every word or thought in its proper place, still the ideas, plans, and attitudes in our prayers are amplified and aided by God’s Spirit flowing between God and ourselves, and the Father responds according to His will for us. Paul continues, providing us greater confidence and boldness before God, “And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose” (verse 28). What joy we should have in knowing that everything will work out splendidly in the end!

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

Giving Thanks

Colossians 3-17 Do Everything in the Name of Jesus beige

July 23, 2017

Giving thanks always for all things unto God (Ephesians 5:20).

No matter what the source of the evil, if you are in God and surrounded by Him as by an atmosphere, all evil has to pass through Him before it comes to you. Therefore you can thank God for everything that comes, not for the sin of it, but for what God will bring out of it and through it. May God make our lives thanksgiving and perpetual praise, then He will make everything a blessing.

We once saw a man draw some black dots. We looked and could make nothing of them but an irregular assemblage of black dots. Then he drew a few lines, put in a few rests, then a clef at the beginning, and we saw these black dots were musical notes. On sounding them we were singing,

“Praise God from whom all blessings flow,
Praise Him all creatures here below.”

There are many black dots and black spots in our lives, and we cannot understand why they are there or why God permitted them to come. But if we let God come into our lives, and adjust the dots in the proper way, and draw the lines He wants, and separate this from that, and put in the rests at the proper places; out of the black dots and spots in our lives He will make a glorious harmony.

Let us not hinder Him in this glorious work!

 

Would we know that the major chords were sweet,
If there were no minor key?
Would the painter’s work be fair to our eyes,
Without shade on land or sea?
Would we know the meaning of happiness,
Would we feel that the day was bright,
If we’d never known what it was to grieve,
Nor gazed on the dark of night?

(Many men owe the grandeur of their lives to their tremendous difficulties ) Charles Spurgeon

 

When the musician presses the black keys on the great organ, the music is as sweet as when he touches the white ones, but to get the capacity of the instrument he must touch them all.

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

The Fruit of the Spirit – Long suffering

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The popular impatiens flowers are so named from seeming to be highly impatient! When their seed pods mature, they explode when touched, sending seeds several yards away. See how this picture illustrates the need for longsuffering, an important fruit of God’s Spirit!

 

July 22, 2017

The Fruit of the Spirit – Longsuffering

 

Anger and animosity can be the result of many negative influences. The evil influence we all are infected with is our own selfish nature. And our human abilities to make major improvements are pitifully weak. We need God’s help!

In Galatians 5:19-21, the apostle Paul refers to our human nature as “the flesh” and our selfish tendencies as the “works of the flesh.” These include “hatred, contentions, jealousies, outbursts of wrath, selfish ambitions, dissensions, heresies, envy, murders”!

Clearly we need the antidote for these traits, which is God’s Spirit!

Paul went on to say, “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control” (Galatians 5:22-23, emphasis added throughout). What an amazing contrast!

All these beautiful virtues work together and support each other. Think about how longsuffering relates to the other attributes.

Two important words
Listed fourth among the fruit of the Spirit is a wonderful quality translated “longsuffering” in some Bible versions and “patience” in others.

Those two English words are closely related, both associated with endurance. More important and fascinating is learning about the two corresponding Greek words in the New Testament.

One Greek word— humpomonee —is translated “patience” in almost all Bible versions and implies patient endurance.

The other Greek word is even more interesting. It is makrothumia, translated “patience” in some Bible versions but more accurately as “longsuffering” in others.

The Greek word makro (which gives us the English prefix macro ) means “large” or “long.” The root word thumos means “temper.” Therefore makrothumia literally means long-tempered, the opposite of short-tempered or having a short fuse.

Without makrothumia, we human beings tend to be temperamental —having an irritable temperament and bad temper. We tend to “lose patience” and “lose our cool” and even “blow up” (like an impatiens plant).

We’ll focus primarily on makrothumia since it is the word used in Galatians 5:22. However, please keep in mind how these two words overlap in meaning and are both important to our spiritual understanding and growth.

Longsuffering and love vs. anger and hate
Longsuffering is virtually the opposite of anger, especially of “outbursts of wrath” (2 Corinthians 12:20).

When a traffic light turns green, some drivers will impatiently honk their horns if the car ahead doesn’t start moving within two seconds! No longsuffering there! Even worse is the epidemic of road rage with cursing and actual violence.

Many people tend to overreact. They quickly get on the defensive, interpret remarks as attacks and then strike back. Many people carry a lot of inner anger from their past. Every small hurt or annoyance adds to the storehouse of anger. The slightest provocation brings the anger to the surface and into the open.

Anger usually involves a spiteful attitude of retaliation and revenge. But God forbids this: “Bless those who persecute you … (Romans 12:14; Romans 12:17; Romans 12:19). The Bible teaches mercy and forgiveness.

People tend to excuse their anger, but most human anger is self-centered and sinful. “The wrath of man does not produce the righteousness of God” (James 1:20).

Hardly anyone will admit to hating people. But the Bible defines love and hatred largely by people’s actions. Love is expressed through helping people, while hate is demonstrated through harming people (see Romans 13:10).

Paul described the behavior of love: “Love suffers long and is kind … [It] does not behave rudely, does not seek its own, is not provoked, thinks no evil” (1 Corinthians 13:4-5). The New International Version renders his words this way: “Love is patient, love is kind … It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.”

Our thoughts and attitudes are likewise important, as they are the source of our actions and words: “A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth good; and an evil man out of the evil treasure of his heart brings forth evil. For out of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaks” (Luke 6:45).

Therefore we should honestly examine our attitudes. Each of us should ask: Am I motivated by love, respect, patience and compassion, or am I motivated by resentment, contempt, intolerance and hardness of heart?

Slow to anger, quick to forgive
“The Lord is gracious and full of compassion, slow to anger and great in mercy” (Psalms 145:8). That’s the way He expects us to be!

Consider carefully these wise words about being “long-tempered”: “He who is slow to wrath has great understanding, but he who is impulsive exalts folly” (Proverbs 14:29). “A wrathful man stirs up strife , but he who is slow to anger allays contention” (Proverbs 15:18). “The discretion of a man makes him slow to anger, and his glory is to overlook a transgression” (Proverbs 19:11).

James wrote, “So then, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath” (James 1:19). Then if and when appropriate anger is expressed, it will likely be under control.

You have probably heard the good advice of “stop and count to 10” and “take some deep breaths” rather than lashing out with words you’ll regret—words that will escalate conflict rather than make peace.

Truly the first step of longsuffering is to exercise restraint and do nothing. We must think first! What does God want me to say or do?

If your feelings are hurt and you feel the need to immediately say something, speak softly and don’t say anything to hurt back. “A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger” (Proverbs 15:1).

Then take as much time as you need to pray and plan regarding the wise and constructive way to approach the other person. Your goal is to act lovingly rather than reacting hatefully.

But these good intentions and good habits are not nearly as powerful as God’s supernatural gift of longsuffering. Good interpersonal relationships depend on you doing your best plus trusting God with the rest. We human beings are pitifully incomplete without God’s Spirit.

How does one obtain the Holy Spirit? The apostle Peter briefly explained in Acts 2:38, “Repent, and let every one of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.”

To truly be “sons of God” we must be “led by the Spirit of God” (Romans 8:14).

In Colossians 3:12-13, Paul describes the nature of someone who is led by God’s Spirit: “Therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, put on tender mercies, kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering; bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if anyone has a complaint against another; even as Christ forgave you, so you also must do.” (He states something very similar in Ephesians 4:1-3.)

Notice how these qualities tie together and give us an expanded view of longsuffering. We need to patiently “bear with one another” rather than allow ourselves to get irritated!

Longsuffering and eternal life
Waiting for others is a test of our patience and an opportunity to build patience. And the Bible has much to say about our need to wait on God. We want God to solve all our problems right now, but God knows the best timing. He often tests our patience and perseverance before answering our prayers.

When the Bible mentions waiting, patience, perseverance or longsuffering, it is often in connection with trusting in God to intervene for us in our need, as He assuredly will: “But those who wait on the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint” (Isaiah 40:31).

This patient waiting is ultimately focused on the second coming of Jesus Christ: “To those who eagerly wait for Him He will appear a second time, apart from sin, for salvation” (Hebrews 9:28).

Only those who remain faithful to death or to Christ’s coming will be rewarded in His Kingdom. After warning about end-time persecution of Christians, Jesus said, “But he who endures to the end will be saved” (Matthew 10:22).

“Endures” means continuing to be led by God’s Spirit and continuing to bear the fruit of His Spirit to the end of your life or the second coming of Christ, whichever comes first.

And James 5:7-8 exhorts us: “Therefore be patient [literally, longsuffering ], brethren, until the coming of the Lord. See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, waiting patiently for it until it receives the early and latter rain. You also be patient. Establish your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is at hand.”

@weatywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

 

 

 

Waiting With Patience

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July 22, 2017

Waiting Upon God

And therefore will the Lord wait, that he may be gracious unto you… blessed are all they that wait for him (Isaiah 30:18).

We must not only think of our waiting upon God, but also of what is more wonderful still, of God’s waiting upon us. The vision of Him waiting on us, will give new impulse and inspiration to our waiting upon Him. It will give us unspeakable confidence that our waiting cannot be in vain. Let us seek even now, at this moment, in the spirit of waiting on God, to find out something of what it means.

He has inconceivably glorious purposes concerning every one of His children. And you ask, “How is it, if He waits to be gracious, that even after I come and wait upon Him, He does not give the. help I seek, but waits on longer and longer?” God is a wise husbandman, “who waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it.” He cannot gather the fruit till it is ripe. He knows when we are spiritually ready to receive the blessing to our profit and His glory. Waiting in the sunshine of His love is what will ripen the soul for His blessing. Waiting under the cloud of trial, that breaks in showers of blessings, is as needful.

Be assured that if God waits longer than you could wish, it is only to make the blessing doubly precious. God waited four thousand years, till the fullness of time, ere He sent His Son. Our times are in His hands; He will avenge His elect speedily; He will make haste for our help, and not delay one hour too long.

~Andrew Murray

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

His Sanctification

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July 22, 2017

Sanctification

This is the will of God, even your sanctification.

1 Thessalonians 4:3

The Death Side.

In sanctification God has to deal with us on the death side as well as on the life side. Many of us spend so much time in the place of death that we get sepulchral. There is always a battle royal before sanctification, always something that tugs with resentment against the demands of Jesus Christ. Immediately the Spirit of God begins to show us what sanctification means, the struggle begins. “If any man come to Me and hate not…his own life, he cannot be My disciple.”

The Spirit of God in the process of sanctification will strip me until I am nothing but “myself,” that is the place of death. Am I willing to be “myself,” and nothing more — no friends, no father, no brother, no self-interest, simply ready for death? That is the condition of sanctification. No wonder Jesus said: “I came not to send peace, but a sword.” This is where the battle comes, and where so many of us faint. We refuse to be identified with the death of Jesus on this point. “But it is so stern,” we say; “He cannot wish me to do that.” Our Lord is stern; and He does wish us to do that.

Am I willing to reduce myself simply to “me,” determinedly to strip myself of all my friends think of me, of all I think of myself, and to hand that simple naked self over to God? Immediately I am, He will sanctify me wholly, and my life will be free from earnestness in connection with every thing but God.

When I pray — “Lord, show me what sanctification means for me,” He will show me. It means being made one with Jesus. Sanctification is not something Jesus Christ puts into me: it is Himself in me.

Oswald Chambers

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

The Days of Prosperity and Adversity

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July 21 2017

The Days of Prosperity and Adversity

“In the day of prosperity be joyful, and in the day of adversity consider: God has made the one as well as the other, so that man may not find out anything that will be after him.”

– Ecclesiastes 7:14

It is no sin to be joyful when we prosper. Though we should be aware of the temptations that are unique to prosperity, we should not therefore think that prosperity is something to be avoided or that we have necessarily done something wrong when we enjoy the good things of life. Jesus, after all, even though He was not a wealthy man and warned that we “cannot serve God and money” (Matt. 6:24), found time to rejoice at the wedding in Cana. He even blessed the guests with a type of prosperity when He turned water into the best wine available (John 2:1–12).

God praises those who give sacrificially to His kingdom (Luke 21:1–4), but He is also clear that a sacrificial spirit is not inherently contrary to the enjoyment of prosperity. Abraham prospered greatly, but he also allowed Lot to possess the choicest portion of the Promised Land (Gen. 13). In the Mosaic law, our Creator promises great prosperity to His obedient people (Deut. 28:1–14). We may even speak of God as having a desire for our prosperity, though we must understand that this will not be fulfilled completely until the new heaven and earth.

Ecclesiastes 7:14 confirms this point, commanding us to be joyful in the day of prosperity. Wise people rejoice when good things have happened to them and when God has tangibly blessed their efforts. There is a place before the face of God to take joy in our Lord’s bounty and to enjoy what He has given us.

Being the realistic student of life in this fallen world that he is, however, the Preacher who wrote the book of Ecclesiastes is under no illusions that God’s people will experience material prosperity at every turn. Actually, there will be days of adversity. Moreover, these days of adversity are no less made or ordained by the Lord than days of prosperity (Eccl. 7:14). Essentially, the Preacher wants us to understand that because God ordains days of both blessing and hardship, there is a place for both in our fallen creation. We should not think that days of trouble are any less from the hand of God than are days of ease and abundance. This will help prevent us from thinking that the Lord is acting less kindly toward us on our difficult days than He is on our easy ones. All that God does is good, and if He has ordained days of trouble for us, we know that He has done so for a good purpose (Rom. 8:28).

Life often fluctuates between good days and bad days, but both are from God. Only He understands how all this works out. We should therefore trust in Him and His goodness.

 

As we grow in faith, we should find ourselves increasingly aware that our hard days are from the Lord no less than our good ones, and we should be thanking Him for bringing trials into our lives through which He works to conform us to the image of His Son. Are you enjoying prosperity at the moment? Rejoice, then, in what the Lord has given you. Are you facing hardship? Know that God is working for your good, and He will use your difficulty to advance His kingdom.

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

 

 

 

Willing To Trust God

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July 21, 2017

Three Degrees Of Faith

 

Let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece (Judges 6:39).

There are degrees to faith. At one stage of Christian experience we cannot believe unless we have some sign or some great manifestation of feeling. We feel our fleece, like Gideon, and if it is wet we are willing to trust God. This may be true faith, but it is imperfect. It always looks for feeling or some token besides the Word of God. It marks quite an advance in faith when we trust God without feelings. It is blessed to believe without having any emotion.

There is a third stage of faith which even transcends that of Gideon and his fleece. The first phase of faith believes when there are favorable emotions, the second believes when there is the absence of feeling, but this third form of faith believes God and His Word when circumstances, emotions, appearances, people, and human reason all urge to the contrary. Paul exercised this faith in Acts 27:20, 25, “And when neither sun nor stars in many days appeared, and no small tempest lay on us, all hope that we should be saved was then taken away.” Notwithstanding all this Paul said, “Wherefore, sirs, be of good cheer; for I believe God, that it shall be even as it was told me.”

May God give us faith to fully trust His Word though everything else witness the other way.

 

When is the time to trust?
Is it when all is calm,
When waves the victor’s palm,
And life is one glad psalm
Of joy and praise?
Nay! but the time to trust
Is when the waves beat high,
When storm clouds fill the sky,
And prayer is one long cry,
O help and save!
When is the time to trust?
Is it when friends are true?
Is it when comforts woo,
And in all we say and do
We meet but praise?
Nay! but the time to trust
Is when we stand alone,
And summer birds have flown,
And every prop is gone,
All else but God.
What is the time to trust?
Is it some future day,
When you have tried your way,
And learned to trust and pray
By bitter woe?
Nay! but the time to trust
Is in this moment’s need,
Poor, broken, bruised reed!
Poor, troubled soul, make speed
To trust thy God.
What is the time to trust?
Is it when hopes beat high,
When sunshine gilds the sky,
And joy and ecstasy
Fill all the heart?
Nay! but the time to trust
Is when our joy is fled,
When sorrow bows the head,
And all is cold and dead,
All else but God.

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn

 

 

 

Our Blessed Advocate

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July 20, 2017

Seeing then that we have a great high Priest… Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. Let us come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need (Hebrews 4:14-16).

Our great Helper in prayer is the Lord Jesus Christ, our Advocate with the Father, our Great High Priest, whose chief ministry for us these centuries has been intercession and prayer. It is he who takes our imperfect petitions from our hands, cleanses them from their defects, corrects their faults, and then claims their answer from His Father on His own account and through His all-atoning merits and righteousness.

If you are fainting in prayer, Look up. Your blessed Advocate has already claimed your answer, and you would grieve and disappoint Him if you were to give up the conflict in the very moment when victory is on its way to meet you. He has gone in for you into the inner chamber, and already holds up your name upon the palms of His hands; and the messenger, which is to bring you your blessing, is now on his way, and the Spirit is only waiting your trust to whisper in your heart the echo of the answer from the throne, “It is done.”

The Spirit has much to do with acceptable prayer, and His work in prayer is too much neglected. He enlightens the mind to see its wants, softens the heart to feel them, quickens our desires after suitable supplies, gives clear views of God’s power, wisdom, and grace to relieve us, and stirs up that confidence in His truth which excludes all wavering.

Prayer is, therefore, a wonderful thing. In every acceptable prayer the whole Trinity is concerned

@wearywithsorrow

Cathey Lynn